FOCUS – Humanitarian Alternatives, a new bilingual review | March 25, 2016

Handicap International Foundation, in collaboration with three other Foundations, recently released the inaugural issue of a new bilingual international review entitled Humanitarian Alternatives (Alternatives Humanitaires in French). Designed to build bridges between practitioners and academics, English- and French-native speakers, its inaugural issue is now available in open access. A new bilingual review A new bilingual […]

Handicap International Foundation, in collaboration with three other Foundations, recently released the inaugural issue of a new bilingual international review entitled Humanitarian Alternatives (Alternatives Humanitaires in French). Designed to build bridges between practitioners and academics, English- and French-native speakers, its inaugural issue is now available in open access.

A new bilingual review

A new bilingual review with an international vocation was recently launched jointly by the Handicap International Foundation, with the Action Against Hunger Foundation, the French Red Cross Fund and the Mérieux Foundation. Several universities and institutes have also stepped in, interested by the challenge.

This project is indeed underpinned by a triple ambition:

  • to offer an open access review contributing to a critical thinking on the humanitarian sector, its practices, challenges and evolutions;
  • to create a space of confluence and dialogue, a proximity and dynamic exchange of views between researchers in humanities and humanitarian practitioners ; in short, a space dedicated to the challenges the humanitarian sector is confronted with;
  • to enhance the international impact of humanitarian approaches rooted in the “without borders” movement, through the pooling of resources, thinking and project.

The very first issue, released in February 2016, is currently available at the following link:
http://alternatives-humanitaires.org/en/

An inaugural issue focused on the latest Ebola outbreak

Focused mainly on the latest Ebola outbreak, this inaugural issue gives a mouthpiece to humanitarian workers and university professors, experts in their own field. One can also find in this issue a brief account of what has constituted, and what constitutes today, humanitarian action beyond the “French doctors” movement or an analysis of how ethical questioning can accompany humanitarian action in the process of change.

Humanitarian Alternatives should be released three to four times a year. Its next issue, intended for May 2016, should focus on the upcoming Wold Humanitarian Summit.

Cover of Humanitarian Alternatives' very first issue
Cover of Humanitarian Alternatives’ very first issue.

 


Share

Posted in Humanitarian Aid, PublicationsTagged