FEEDBACK – World’s ministries renew commitments on road safety | February 25, 2020

conference room

The 3rd Ministerial Conference on Road Safety (Stockholm, 19-20 February 2020) hosted more than 80 Ministers and about 1700 participants from 140 countries. Despite competing global health emergencies, the high level of participation shows that road safety is getting increasing political attention and commitments. This Conference marked the end of the UN Decade of Action […]

The 3rd Ministerial Conference on Road Safety (Stockholm, 19-20 February 2020) hosted more than 80 Ministers and about 1700 participants from 140 countries. Despite competing global health emergencies, the high level of participation shows that road safety is getting increasing political attention and commitments.

This Conference marked the end of the UN Decade of Action on Road Safety (2011-2020) and the starting point for continued collaboration on road safety. Road traffic crashes take some 1.35 million lives every year and 93 per cent of the world’s road crashes occur in low- and middle-income countries. Despite some limited progress, concentrated in high income countries, it is clear that we are very far from achieving the Sustainable Development Goal target 3.6, which sets the commitment to halve the number of road traffic deaths by 2020.

A call for increased commitments on road safety post-2020

The Stockholm Declaration, the outcome of this Conference, is a forward-looking statement that connects road safety to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. In line with most of the demands expressed by civil society (read the People’s Declaration promoted by the Global Alliance of NGOs for Road Safety, to which HI significantly contributed) the Stockholm Declaration resolves to:

  • Address the connections between road safety, mental and physical health, development, education, equity, gender equality, sustainable cities, environment and climate change,
  • Improve accessibility and all aspects of road safety from crash prevention to emergency response and trauma care,
  • Give special attention to the safety needs of those road users who are the most vulnerable,
  • Encourage increased investment in road safety,
  • Continue action on the road safety related SDG targets, including 3.6 after 2020.

The work of civil society organisations, like HI, continues alongside the efforts of many other stakeholders, in order to ensure that these high-level commitments lead to tangible impact.


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Posted in Development, Feedback, Road SafetyTagged