FEEDBACK – The Fourth Review Conference to the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention | December 10, 2019

conference room

Humanity & Inclusion (HI) was present at the Fourth Review Conference to the Convention on the Prevention of the Use, Stockpiling, Production, and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction in Oslo last week. Alongside 700 other participants including national authorities, civil society organizations, UN agencies and humanitarian organizations, survivors and youth participants, HI […]

Humanity & Inclusion (HI) was present at the Fourth Review Conference to the Convention on the Prevention of the Use, Stockpiling, Production, and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction in Oslo last week.

Alongside 700 other participants including national authorities, civil society organizations, UN agencies and humanitarian organizations, survivors and youth participants, HI attended the conference with the aim to call on states to “finish the job”  consistently with the commitment taken in Maputo in 2014.

This week aimed at discussing and reviewing together, different actions possible to reach the 2025 completion goal such as, clearing affected areas, providing victim assistance and strengthening compliance.

A week of thorough review

Today, nearly 22 years after the adoption of the Anti-personnel Mine Ban Convention, mines are still an ongoing issue: 55 countries are still mine-affected and 60 million people are still concerned by mines, Improvised Explosive Device (IED) or Explosive Remnants of War (ERW).

Moreover, the rise of violence in specific contexts led to more appealing findings. In 2018, one country was reportedly still using landmines at its border, and the number of mine victims has doubled in the last five years.

Those new challenges require new approaches to assure both a landmine free world and a continued and sustainable Victim Assistance (VA). HI highlighted this throughout the week, during exchanges with donor states and affected states, and also during its organized side events.

Thus, the side even on “innovative technology” involving both organizations and survivors, discussed the numerous opportunities offered by new technologies, such as 3D printers when used to produce prosthesis and the use of drones for mine clearance and land release activities.

HI also brought attention to Comprehensive Approach to Mine Action (CAMA) and Conflict Sensitivity, two key and necessary approaches towards a sustainable landmine free world.

A possible “What’s next?”

Numerous good news were shared over the week in Oslo. As a step towards our common goal of a Landmine Free World by 2025, Thailand declared having destroyed its stockpiles and Chile has almost finished its work on mine clearance.

Moreover, this week also allowed States Parties to renew their pledge and dedication for the goals set in the Ottawa Treaty 22 years ago. Three main documents were thus approved: the Review document, a text taking the stock of what has been done over the past 5 year, the Oslo Action Plan (OAP) and the Oslo Political Declaration to support the latter.

The main document, the OAP, reunites 164 State Parties and 49 points. It will underpin the work during the 2020-2024 period, assuring that states will work in line with the 2025 goal.

HI commends the work led by the Presidency and appreciates some key elements of the Oslo Action Plan that, for the first time, includes indicators to facilitate the monitoring of its implementation and an entire section on explosive ordnance risk education. Furthermore, HI is particularly happy to see gender, age and disability mainstreamed all along the OAP together with strong action points of victim assistance and compliance mechanisms.

Sudan is now the 2020 elected chair and will endorse the 18th presidency of the Review Conference, directing the following steps towards a unified answer to landmines impact.


Source:

Press release from the International Campaign to Ban Landmines


Share

Posted in Disarmament, Disarmament Treaties, FeedbackTagged