FEEDBACK – DFID’s Disability Framework – One Year On | December 18, 2015

In 2014 the UK Government’s Department for International Development (DFID) launched their Disability Framework: Leaving no one behind. On 3rd December 2015 – International Day of Disabled People – DFID launched the Disability Framework One Year On: Leaving No One Behind. So why is this document important for HI’s work? Providing a major opportunity for […]

In 2014 the UK Government’s Department for International Development (DFID) launched their Disability Framework: Leaving no one behind. On 3rd December 2015 – International Day of Disabled People – DFID launched the Disability Framework One Year On: Leaving No One Behind. So why is this document important for HI’s work?

Providing a major opportunity for Handicap International to engage with DFID, the Disability Framework is aimed specifically at DFID staff in the UK and throughout the world, outlining:

  • DFID’s commitment to the inclusion of disabled people in its work and recognition that they often face significant levels of discrimination and stigma everyday.
  • Acknowledgement that DFID needs to do more to ensure that disabled people do not remain excluded from development initiatives.
  • Presents DFID’s intention to consolidate and explain the changes that are happening within DFID to strengthen disability inclusion in its policies and programmes.
  • DFID’s recognition that the Disability Framework will only successful in its aims if there is full cooperation from DFID staff and partners around the world to deliver inclusive actions where there is capacity to do so.

Besides updating on key priority policy areas such as education, health, humanitarian, girls and women (and VAGW), the Disability Framework also outlines how DFID will deliver its vision of inclusion through ensuring programme assessments, showing value for money, improving data collection, and ensuring partners do their part to ensure inclusion.

In launching the updated Disability Framework, the UK Government’s Secretary of State for International Development, Justine Greening said, “The review showed us that there is much more that we and our partners can do to ensure people with disabilities are included in and benefit from the day-to-day work we are already doing.”

Taking the SoS at her word it is important that we see the Disability Framework as an effective advocacy tool that enables HI Programmes and Technical Advisors to engage with DFID both in the UK, but more importantly, at country level.

Contact with HI Programmes this year has shown that engagement with DFID has improved, or increased, because DFID country programmes have been made aware of the Disability Framework and their obligations to engagement with it. Countries such as Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Kenya and Nepal have all reported closer working relationships with DFID, with Bangladesh and Nepal being invited to participate in DFID’s country level operational planning.

Of course it will be some time before the inclusion is fully embedded into all DFID programming, but the political will is there as is the policy document to help propel the inclusion agenda forward. Used in conjunction with the Thematic Briefing Papers mentioned in a previous blog we have some useful resources to work with DFID proactively which will ultimately put HI in a better position to generate more income for our work.

For more information the Disability Framework contact Jazz Shaban and for the full document, click here

 


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