About Us


Humanity & Inclusion

Humanity & Inclusion, also known as Handicap International (HI), is an independent and impartial international aid organisation operating in situations of poverty and exclusion, conflict and disaster. It works alongside people with disabilities and vulnerable populations, taking action and bearing witness in order to respond to their essential needs, improve their living conditions and promote respect for their dignity and their fundamental rights.
See our institutional website (https://hi.org/ ) for more information on our organisation and our action.

In the early years of HI existence, the impetus to fight against landmines arose directly from our activities in the refugee camps of Cambodia and Thailand, where HI’s teams witnessed the extent of the tragedy caused by landmines. A decade later, HI decided to take up the fight against cluster munitions, as these weapons also had indiscriminate effects on civilians, both during and long after conflicts.
The fights led by the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL) and the Cluster Munition Coalition (CMC), international NGO networks co-founded by HI, have resulted in the adoption of two international disarmament treaties: the Mine Ban Treaty (Ottawa, 1997), the first international treaty to ban a specific conventional weapon, and the Convention on Cluster Munitions (Oslo, 2008). The ICBL was seen as such a great achievement for peace worldwide that it was co-awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1997.
Since then, HI has been consistently pressing for necessary policy changes in a greater number of policy areas, placing the rights, dignity and well-being of vulnerable populations, in particular victims of conflict and persons with disabilities, at the core of its fight.

In the early years of HI existence, the impetus to fight against landmines arose directly from our activities in the refugee camps of Cambodia and Thailand, where HI’s teams witnessed the extent of the tragedy caused by landmines. A decade later, HI decided to take up the fight against cluster munitions, as these weapons also had indiscriminate effects on civilians, both during and long after conflicts.
The fights led by the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL) and the Cluster Munition Coalition (CMC), international NGO networks co-founded by HI, have resulted in the adoption of two international disarmament treaties: the Mine Ban Treaty (Ottawa, 1997), the first international treaty to ban a specific conventional weapon, and the Convention on Cluster Munitions (Oslo, 2008). The ICBL was seen as such a great achievement for peace worldwide that it was co-awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1997.
Since then, HI has been consistently pressing for necessary policy changes in a greater number of policy areas, placing the rights, dignity and well-being of vulnerable populations, in particular victims of conflict and persons with disabilities, at the core of its fight.

Principles of our actions for global policy change

HI has a distinctive influence expertise defined by:
Messages on evidence from our countries of operations, and in our sectors of expertise – inclusive humanitarian action, disability-inclusive development, disarmament & protection of civilians – to guarantee both the legitimacy and the credibility of HI’s policy analyses and recommendations,
a determination to ensure that the voice of the affected communities themselves are heard,
and the will to address the roots of injustice at the global level through direct lobbying actions towards decision makers, international coalitions of NGOs, public and media awareness campaigns. We aspire to address intersecting factors of discrimination, marginalisation and vulnerability throughout our advocacy work. These principles guarantee the consistency between our activity in countries of operations and the strong messages we deliver on the global scene.

Areas of actions for global policy change

For 35 years, HI has aimed to respond to the essential needs, improve the living conditions, and promote respect for the fundamental rights and dignity of persons with disabilities and vulnerable populations.
Today, HI seeks to influence States, United Nations institutions, the European Union and other multilateral organisations to actively promote change.
Leveraging obligations embedded in international treaties such as the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability (2009) and pledges taken by the international community at the international level in the 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development (2015), the Agenda for Humanity (2016), we strive to obtain concrete policy changes in the three areas of our advocacy work: humanitarian action, development and disarmament.